Temperature

+--------+--------+--------+--------+--------+-------+-------+-------+-------+--------+
| C   F  | C   F  | C   F  | C   F  | C   F  | C   F | C   F | C   F | C   F | C   F  |
+--------+--------+--------+--------+--------+-------+-------+-------+-------+--------+
|80   176|70   158|60   140|50   122|40   104|30   86|20   68|10   50| 0   32|_10   14|
|79 174.2|69 156.2|59 138.2|49 120.2|39 102.2|29 84.2|19 66.2| 9 48.2|_1 30.2|_11 12.2|
|78 172.4|68 154.4|58 136.4|48 118.4|38 100.4|28 82.4|18 64.4| 8 46.4|_2 28.4|_12 10.4|
|77 170.6|67 152.6|57 134.6|47 116.6|37  98.6|27 80.6|17 62.6| 7 44.6|_3 26.6|_13  8.6|
|76 168.8|66 150.8|56 132.8|46 114.8|36  96.8|26 78.8|16 60.8| 6 42.8|_4 24.8|_14  6.8|
|75   167|65   149|55   131|45   113|35    95|25   77|15   59| 5   41|_5   23|_15    5|
|74 165.2|64 147.2|54 129.2|44 111.2|34  93.2|24 75.2|14 57.2| 4 39.2|_6 21.2|_16  3.2|
|73 163.4|63 145.4|53 127.4|43 109.4|33  91.4|23 73.4|13 55.4| 3 37.4|_7 19.4|_17  1.4|
|72 161.6|62 143.6|52 125.6|42 107.6|32  89.6|22 71.6|12 53.6| 2 35.6|_8 17.6|_18 _0.4|
|71 159.8|61 141.8|51 123.8|41 105.8|31  87.8|21 69.8|11 51.8| 1 33.8|_9 15.8|_19 _2.2|
+--------+--------+--------+--------+--------+-------+-------+-------+-------+--------+
Table of Equivalent Temperatures Celsius and Fahrenheit temperatures can be interconverted as follows: C = (F - 32) × 100/180; F = (C × 180/100) + 32. J Language phrase used to generate the above table is
(<' C F'),: <@:>"1 ] _10]\ 32 1.8 (] <@,"0 p.) |._19+i.100

Temperature is a measure of the degree of hotness of the air. Three different scales are used for measuring temperature. Scientists use the Kelvin, or absolute, scale and the Celsius, or centigrade, scale. Most nations use the Celsius scale, although the United States continues to use the Fahrenheit scale.

Temperature on earth averages 15° C (59° F) at sea level but varies according to latitude, elevation, season, and time of day, ranging from a record high of 58° C (140° F) to a record low of -88° C (-130° F). Temperature is generally highest in the Tropics and lowest near the poles. Each day it is usually warmest during midafternoon and coldest around dawn. Seasonal variations of temperature are generally more pronounced at higher latitudes. Along the equator, all months are equally warm, but away from the equator, it is generally warmest about a month after the summer solstice (around June 21 in the northern hemisphere and around December 21 in the southern hemisphere) and coldest about a month after the winter solstice (around December 21 in the northern hemisphere and around June 21 in the southern hemisphere). Temperature can change abruptly when fronts (boundaries between two air masses with different temperatures or densities) or thunderstorms pass overhead.

Temperature decreases with increasing elevation at an average rate of about 6.5° C per km (about 19° F per mi). As a result, temperatures in the mountains are generally much lower than at sea level. Temperature continues to decrease throughout the atmosphere’s lowest layer, the troposphere, where almost all weather occurs. The troposphere extends to a height of 16 km (10 mi) above sea level over the equator and about 8 km (about 5 mi) above sea level over the poles. Above the troposphere is the stratosphere, where temperature levels off and then begins to increase with height. Almost no weather occurs in the stratosphere.

References

Cited "Temperature," Microsoft® Encarta® Online Encyclopedia 2004
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